Bob Dylan is an Intovert

I just finished reading Another Side of Bob Dylan, which I recommend to Dylan fans. I try to read a book on Dylan every year or so, because the man is a fascinating genre and many people that know or studied him have written extensively about him. This book is written by Jacob Maymudes, with help from tapes recorded by his late father, Victor, about his relationship with Dylan.

What is unique to this book is Victor Maymudes’ proximity to Dylan as he wrote many early songs. I was heartened, as an introvert, to hear Dylan’s introversion described as an asset to his writing. I guess it’s always been pretty obvious that Dylan is introverted, but I always kind of assumed it was part of his eccentricity or reclusive nature. I never thought about his introversion contributing to his brilliance and creativity. That is exactly what Maymudes describes. For Bob Dylan, the world happens inside his head. He takes in world events, and formulates the ideas and words that changed the world through introspective though. When workshopping a song, it was almost always complete by the time he was sharing it with Maymudes and others.

As introverts, we are often told that our introversion is something to overcome. I have actually received feedback that said “seems introverted”, as if my personality is a professional misstep to be corrected. Sure, meetings with large personalities can be a challenge, and we certainly don’t excel in networking situations. But while extroverts are busy proclaiming every thought that comes into their head to the world, introverts are observing, learning, thinking, formulating ideas, arguments and beliefs.

Extroverts are absolutely capable of complex thought, I would never suggest otherwise. However, it is refreshing to hear introversion described as something that aids critical thinking, creativity, and the development of Nobel-prize winning poetry.

 

Coffee / Beer / Sleep

I’ve been on the road for work all week, which almost always leaves me drained. As an introvert, this can be especially tough since it often involves long days surrounded by coworkers and clients. They are great people, but as any introvert can relate to, I need my down time in order to recharge.

It has reminded me of the three things I use to recharge. The first is coffee. I love coffee. I drink it several times every day. I spend a lot of time searching out great new coffees. When I was studying for the GMAT or applying to business school, I would get home from work every day drained, but knew I had to march to Starbucks to load up on caffeine and study/write. Coffee is how I power through when I need to.

Grabbing a drink with friends is another way I recharge. When I was younger, it seemed like the natural course of action. I needed to make sure I wasn’t burning myself out from too much fun. In my 30s, and as an introvert, I actually need to make sure I make time for this kind of thing, especially with coworkers. It’s important, and a night spending quality time with people, especially those I haven’t seen in a long time, can do far more to recharge my batteries than anything.

Finally, sometimes you just need to go home and rest. It’s obvious that this will need to take priority over social outings, but there are times when it is critical that it takes priority over the coffee. Pulling an all nighter might seem like the right thing to do, but it’s important to consider the quality of your work. If faced with the option of working from midnight until 2am or shutting down and working from 5-7am, I will always do better work after getting some sleep.