Ads That Follow You

Do you ever buy something online, and then have an ad promoting that same product follow you to every website you visit for the next two weeks? I remember complaining about this to someone at Google, who told me “that should never happen”. I took this to mean that technology and digital media buyers were savvy enough to know the difference between me buying a product and me showing interest in that product.

I think it is now time to draw the conclusion that we have not reached that point. My experience was not an aberration, I still see this consistently. I don’t think it’s a technology or a strategy issue, it’s an incentive issue.

Media buying companies want to connect supply with demand, and remove as many barriers as possible. If I fall into a bucket of customers that are interested in a product,  they have more supply and demand to make money off of. I believe the technology exists to segment me out from the people that never actually purchased the product, but that would require more effort on their agency’s part. Effort = cost, and for now clients aren’t screaming loud enough for that extra effort.

I am not inclined to be overly critical of clients here. These media buys are likely a small piece of their marketing plan. They correctly allocate their time elsewhere, generating the demand that got me to buy their product in the first place. However, there has been a lot of talk about major CPG companies reviewing digital spend, so maybe there is hope.

I hear clients talk about personalization to the point that the term loses its meaning. I think Seth Godin makes a great point when he says that personalization is overrated and personal marketing is underrated. Market to me like you know me, and we might develop a relationship. Showing me ads for a product I’ve already bought is not how you do that. Marketers should seek to use technology to return to the days when we’d shop at stores where everyone knows us by name. The recommendations should make sense, and further our trust with the brand. It really isn’t that difficult to just show me a similar or complimentary product to the one I already purchased. Unfortunately, I think we have a long way to go.

Jason Alexander Gets Business Leadership

Jason Alexander gave a tremendous interview on WTF with Marc Maron recently, during which he used a metaphor to talk about acting that resonated with me. While studying acting in college, he learned the tools of acting, but was never taught how to turn those tools into a successful career. He has obviously succeeded, but had he not found fame, he argues that he wouldn’t have known how to create work for himself. He didn’t understand the politics of getting something made, he didn’t know how to write parts for himself, and he certainly didn’t understand the business side of things.

His metaphor was that had he been studying to become a construction worker, he would have been taught how to swing a hammer, how to use a saw, and how to use all of the other tools that are used in construction. However, if someone asked him to build a house, he’d be lost.

I find this metaphor to be very relevant to a post I wrote on specialization. In it, I argued that recent college graduates seeking a career in digital marketing should seek to specialize in a skill or tool. The specializations I refer to are similar to the acting tools that Jason Alexander refers to.

However, I think Jason Alexander provides some additional insight, where my post fell short. That is how valuable the skill of the generalist/strategist are. Far too often, for those that know how to swing a hammer, every problem looks like a nail. It’s great to be able to swing a hammer well, but the hammer needs to be used skillfully and to address the right problems. Believe it or not, this is not always the case.

This is where I come in – the generalist, the strategist. I may not swing a hammer well or even know how to swing a hammer, but I know when to pull in the hammer swingers (or throwers). Using Alexander’s metaphor, I can design the house for you, but I’m going to pull in the right person to use the right tools at the right time. If you were to go directly to the expert hammer swinger, guess what they would start doing immediately? Start hammering.

What Alexander is very keen to that I omitted – is that understanding your craft or specialization is crucial. If he didn’t have the tools of acting, he never would have made it as George Costanza. However, turn that skillset into a successful career you should seek to understand the bigger picture. Understand how your work fits into the overall strategy of what your organization is trying to accomplish. If your role is to optimize your company’s website, understand that this is tied to a larger goal – to generate awareness, drive sales, to collect information. Understanding how you fit into the overall puzzle, and how the other pieces of the puzzle fit together is the key to leadership.

I realize that co-opting a metaphor for a completely separate point is not the greatest writing, but I TOLD YOU MARC MARON WOULD HELP YOUR CAREER!