We’re all addicted to this?

That’s what I think any time I log into Facebook anymore. Clickbait quizzes, horribly off-target ads, pictures of people I don’t really know or care to know anymore. Why do I keep going back? It’s unclear to me whether my actual friends don’t use Facebook anymore, or if Facebook’s algorithms are just that bad.

The one thing I do believe Facebook knows about me is the number of times I am so bored that Twitter and Instagram no longer hold my attention. Although, I guess Facebook does understand what I’ve been up to in Instagram.

Another piece of data I think might be interesting to these data hungry companies is sleep habits. Netflix knows (or could if it chooses to) my sleep habits. When I can’t sleep – it knows. When I’m about to go to sleep (I usually watch the same show before I go to bed) – it knows. I don’t think they are using this to sell ads yet, but they certainly could. And how long will their investors ignore this obvious revenue stream?

I guess what confuses/disappoints me is not that we have gotten addicted to something and willingly allowed it to harvest our data to the detriment of society. That makes sense to me. I guess I’m disappointed by how lame the product was that did us all in. Maybe Aaron Sorkin can make this interesting for us in the movie version.

Bob Dylan is an Intovert

I just finished reading Another Side of Bob Dylan, which I recommend to Dylan fans. I try to read a book on Dylan every year or so, because the man is a fascinating genre and many people that know or studied him have written extensively about him. This book is written by Jacob Maymudes, with help from tapes recorded by his late father, Victor, about his relationship with Dylan.

What is unique to this book is Victor Maymudes’ proximity to Dylan as he wrote many early songs. I was heartened, as an introvert, to hear Dylan’s introversion described as an asset to his writing. I guess it’s always been pretty obvious that Dylan is introverted, but I always kind of assumed it was part of his eccentricity or reclusive nature. I never thought about his introversion contributing to his brilliance and creativity. That is exactly what Maymudes describes. For Bob Dylan, the world happens inside his head. He takes in world events, and formulates the ideas and words that changed the world through introspective though. When workshopping a song, it was almost always complete by the time he was sharing it with Maymudes and others.

As introverts, we are often told that our introversion is something to overcome. I have actually received feedback that said “seems introverted”, as if my personality is a professional misstep to be corrected. Sure, meetings with large personalities can be a challenge, and we certainly don’t excel in networking situations. But while extroverts are busy proclaiming every thought that comes into their head to the world, introverts are observing, learning, thinking, formulating ideas, arguments and beliefs.

Extroverts are absolutely capable of complex thought, I would never suggest otherwise. However, it is refreshing to hear introversion described as something that aids critical thinking, creativity, and the development of Nobel-prize winning poetry.

 

Coffee / Beer / Sleep

I’ve been on the road for work all week, which almost always leaves me drained. As an introvert, this can be especially tough since it often involves long days surrounded by coworkers and clients. They are great people, but as any introvert can relate to, I need my down time in order to recharge.

It has reminded me of the three things I use to recharge. The first is coffee. I love coffee. I drink it several times every day. I spend a lot of time searching out great new coffees. When I was studying for the GMAT or applying to business school, I would get home from work every day drained, but knew I had to march to Starbucks to load up on caffeine and study/write. Coffee is how I power through when I need to.

Grabbing a drink with friends is another way I recharge. When I was younger, it seemed like the natural course of action. I needed to make sure I wasn’t burning myself out from too much fun. In my 30s, and as an introvert, I actually need to make sure I make time for this kind of thing, especially with coworkers. It’s important, and a night spending quality time with people, especially those I haven’t seen in a long time, can do far more to recharge my batteries than anything.

Finally, sometimes you just need to go home and rest. It’s obvious that this will need to take priority over social outings, but there are times when it is critical that it takes priority over the coffee. Pulling an all nighter might seem like the right thing to do, but it’s important to consider the quality of your work. If faced with the option of working from midnight until 2am or shutting down and working from 5-7am, I will always do better work after getting some sleep.

Keeping Too Much

More wisdom from Marc Maron’s podcast arrived today, this time from Bill Simmons, someone that I have mixed feelings about (best summarized by Deadspin). My personal feelings aside (which are 99% due to me being a Buffalo Bills fan and him being a Patriots apologist), there is no question that the guy is brilliant and was a visionary for sports media.

The insight that Maron unearthed today is about directing a documentary. Simmons said that the number one mistake that documentary directors make is that they keep too much. They fall in love with what they have created and they don’t cut material that doesn’t add to their overall story.

This is directly relevant to life in consulting. Often the work we do culminates in a powerpoint presentation, of which 20 slides are presented to a client, and another 40-300 slides are relegated to the “appendix” (aka slide grave yard). These presentations are usually developed by teams, with individual contributors “owning” certain slides. As the presentation date nears, senior leaders get involved and, more often than not, completely obliterate everything that the team has developed.

This can be frustrating, but it is a very important step. It took me a few years of consulting to learn this, but the goal of any presentation should be to tell a story. Narratives are how we organize our thoughts as humans. No matter who we are, how smart we are, how senior we are, our thoughts are organized in narratives – and that is how we make decisions.

Frequently, someone will put a week’s worth of work into creating a slide that turns out great. It makes sense of complex data, it is visually appealing, and it makes the team look very smart. But when it comes time to review the presentation in its entirety, it doesn’t fit into the story. The mistake I would make early in my career is to force the story to fit around these impressive slides. What I have learned, however, is that nothing is more important than the story. I will never forget the time a very senior person in our organization said, “we create great slides, and fall in love with them, but we have to kill them”.

Which brings us back to Simmons. I can only make assumptions about what it’s like to create a documentary, but I imagine there are parallels to consulting. A documentary typically covers a complex topic, one that requires viewers to understand a backstory. There are generally interviews or first-hand research that needs to be conveyed. Finally, their needs to be some sort of resolution.

This is what consulting is. Clients come to use with their most complicated problems. We often need to help them to define the problem – or at least help them articulate it for their counterparts – in a way that communicates business impact. We need to present findings – often employee interviews or customer data – in a way that makes sense to a broad audience. Then, depending on the scope of the engagement, we need show a path forward for the client. The path forward is really what drives the narrative of any presentation. Anything on a slide – a graphic, text box, sentence or word – that does not add to the story, should be removed.

Fred Wilson expresses a similar thought on his blog today, about entrepreneurs considering alternative formats to pitch decks. His key message is to find the medium that works best for you to convince him to invest in your business. I would argue that the goal is to tell the best story. To help the VC understand who you are, why your business will be successful, and why your team would work well with theirs.

I imagine that it is more difficult for documentarians to know what the narrative is, because they are usually covering a very broad topic (someone’s life, a war, jazz, food, a year, a country, a state, a city) and the narrative can go off in any number of directions. In consulting, we have the benefit of direction from our client – and the ultimate understanding that we are there to help our client save money or make money.

Re-entering the Real World post-MBA

There are plenty of complications when entering the real world after taking a few years off to get your MBA. One thing I realized quickly is that I was no longer analyzing things from the perspective of a CEO. Most of the thinking you do in MBA coursework is through the eyes of an executive, which makes sense. It also makes sense that I should return to my place as a cog in the wheel immediately following my MBA. Nevertheless, it can be jarring.

I never expected my clients to hand over the reins of their companies and ask me to make key strategic decisions for them. The issue that I had, was the realization that my work was not directly related to what I had learned in school. It further compounded the already complicated question of “am I using my MBA?”.

I remember early on in my first year, hearing a second-year student say, “this isn’t trade school”. He advised that we seek to learn as much as possible and not focus on building skills for a job. I still think that this is valuable advice. But it doesn’t counteract the steep learning curve waiting for you post-MBA. It also requires that you find ways to bring out the value of your MBA for your employer. I like to think of the equation as this: the experience everyone else has + MBA = more valuable employee. The key to the equation is “the experience everyone else has”. This assumes you can acquire all this experience. This is where networking, rolling up your sleeves, volunteering and internships all come into play.

No road out of business school is an easy one. MBAs are expected to tackle difficult tasks, work long hours, and be prepared for anything. This road might not be easy, but it is rewarding. It offers flexibility and plenty of career options.

Jason Alexander Gets Business Leadership

Jason Alexander gave a tremendous interview on WTF with Marc Maron recently, during which he used a metaphor to talk about acting that resonated with me. While studying acting in college, he learned the tools of acting, but was never taught how to turn those tools into a successful career. He has obviously succeeded, but had he not found fame, he argues that he wouldn’t have known how to create work for himself. He didn’t understand the politics of getting something made, he didn’t know how to write parts for himself, and he certainly didn’t understand the business side of things.

His metaphor was that had he been studying to become a construction worker, he would have been taught how to swing a hammer, how to use a saw, and how to use all of the other tools that are used in construction. However, if someone asked him to build a house, he’d be lost.

I find this metaphor to be very relevant to a post I wrote on specialization. In it, I argued that recent college graduates seeking a career in digital marketing should seek to specialize in a skill or tool. The specializations I refer to are similar to the acting tools that Jason Alexander refers to.

However, I think Jason Alexander provides some additional insight, where my post fell short. That is how valuable the skill of the generalist/strategist are. Far too often, for those that know how to swing a hammer, every problem looks like a nail. It’s great to be able to swing a hammer well, but the hammer needs to be used skillfully and to address the right problems. Believe it or not, this is not always the case.

This is where I come in – the generalist, the strategist. I may not swing a hammer well or even know how to swing a hammer, but I know when to pull in the hammer swingers (or throwers). Using Alexander’s metaphor, I can design the house for you, but I’m going to pull in the right person to use the right tools at the right time. If you were to go directly to the expert hammer swinger, guess what they would start doing immediately? Start hammering.

What Alexander is very keen to that I omitted – is that understanding your craft or specialization is crucial. If he didn’t have the tools of acting, he never would have made it as George Costanza. However, turn that skillset into a successful career you should seek to understand the bigger picture. Understand how your work fits into the overall strategy of what your organization is trying to accomplish. If your role is to optimize your company’s website, understand that this is tied to a larger goal – to generate awareness, drive sales, to collect information. Understanding how you fit into the overall puzzle, and how the other pieces of the puzzle fit together is the key to leadership.

I realize that co-opting a metaphor for a completely separate point is not the greatest writing, but I TOLD YOU MARC MARON WOULD HELP YOUR CAREER!

Podcasts

I spend a lot of time listening to podcasts. Probably too much. Many of the podcasts I listen to are purely for entertainment purposes, but I believe that there are some that  help me to learn and grow. For the latter group, I created this list: Podcasts that will help your career.

I do think there is a lot of value in podcasts as a medium. It’s great to have a forum for intelligent, entertaining and engaging people explore interesting topics or just share their thoughts for as long or as short as they deem reasonable.

On this list I share why I think each podcast can be beneficial to your career. I will update the list periodically, since I am always on the lookout for new podcasts to listen to. Suggestions and feedback are always welcome.